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Online learning—Management

This section deals with the management options for controlling flystrike, except for treatment and the use of the FlyBoss Tools, which are in separate sections. 

Structured reading

For those who like to see all the information and simply read through it in order. Each heading is a link to a page of information—the dot point provides a summary of the page.

Tip: Keep this page open and open the links in new tabs.

Management
Overview of managing flystrike.

National Wool Declaration
Description of and link to the National Wool Declaration.

Shearing and crutching
How shearing and crutching times affect the suceptibility of sheep to flystrike.

Flystrike protection—jetting and spray-on products
How the timing of application of chemical flystrike prevantion products affects the suceptibility of sheep to flystrike.

Worm and dag management
The role of scouring in flystrike.

Tail length
Description of the correct length to which tails should be docked.

Breech modification
Methods to permanently decrease breech strike susceptibility. 

 

Question and answer

For those who prefer a problem based approach to learning, answer the following questions.
Each of the questions below links further down the page to the answers.

Questions:

You can also click on each question below to go to FlyBoss pages with related information.

  1. What 9 factors should you consider when reviewing your annual flystrike management plan?
  2. How does completing the National Wool Declaration (when you sell wool) help industry?
  3. How much more likely to be flystruck is a sheep with dag score 2 compared with dag score 1?
  4. What are the causes of scouring that would need to be managed to reduce flystrike risk? 
  5. What are the 4 strategies you can use to manage dag and lower flystrike risk?
  6. What is the correct length to which tails should be docked, and why is this important?
  7. If mulesing is to be done, who should carry it out?
  8. What pain relief should be applied when mulesing sheep?

Answers:

You can also click on each question below to go to FlyBoss pages with related information.

1. What 9 factors should you consider when reviewing your annual flystrike management plan?

Management strategies

1.    Shearing, crutching and lambing dates

2.    Breech modification strategies

Breeding strategies

3.    Selection strategies (breeding for flystrike resistance)

4.    Dag management strategies

Chemical strategies

5.    Treatment chemical group

6.    Application method

8.    Optimum time you apply treatment

9.    Predicted wool residues

2. How does completing the National Wool Declaration (when you sell wool) help industry?

The information that you declare in the National Wool Declaration is translated into codes that appear on the wool sale catalogues and certificates. The information is vital in providing transparency to the wool supply chain about management practices in the Australian sheep industry.

3. How much more likely to be flystruck is a sheep with dag score 2 compared with dag score 1?

As dag score increases, the risk of breech strike increases dramatically. A dag score 2 sheep is twice as likely to be struck on the breech as a score 1 sheep. A sheep with dag score 4 is seven times more likely to be struck than a score 1 sheep. The causes of scouring can differ in summer and winter rainfall areas.

4. What are the causes of scouring that would need to be managed to reduce flystrike risk? 

In summer rainfall areas the major causes of scouring and dags are

  • worm or larval challenge in sheep with little immunity
  • rapid change to a high quality pasture
  • occasionally coccidia

In winter rainfall environments the major causes of scouring and dags are

  • heavy worm burdens or larval challenge in sheep with little immunity
  • larval hypersensitivity in worm immune sheep

5. What are the 4 strategies you can use to manage dag and lower flystrike risk?

  • Use worm egg counts to monitor worm burdens and understand the causes of scouring in the flock.
  • Use WormBoss to develop an effective worm management strategy and drench program.
  • Use crutching strategically to remove dags during high risk periods for flystrike.
  • Consider selecting rams that have low Worm Egg Count (WEC) and Dag Score (LDAG) ASBVs and low Dag Scores.

6. What is the correct length to which tails should be docked, and why is this important?

Docking the tail to the correct length at lamb marking time is crucial in minimising stain around the breech and reducing flystrike risk throughout the sheep’s life.

The recommendation is to dock the tail immediately below the third palpable joint or to the tip of the vulva in ewes.

This tail length allows the sheep to lift its tail and channel urine and faeces away from the breech area. It also reduces the risk of cancers from exposure of soft tissue to the sun.

7. If mulesing is to be done, who should carry it out?

If you plan to continue mulesing in the short term, use an accredited mulesing contractor or undertake training to become an accredited mulesing contractor. Contact the Livestock Contractors Association to find accredited contractors or to enquire about training.

8. What pain relief should be applied when mulesing sheep?

Tri-Solfen® is available as a pain relief product for the mules operation. 

 


Links to the other FlyBoss online learning topics

  1. Susceptibility
  2. Breeding and selection 
  3. Management (you are currently on this page)
  4. Treatment
  5. FlyBoss Tools